High Protein Ketogenic Diet

The standard ketogenic diet is making headlines, with many people losing weight quickly while accelerating fat loss.

Unfortunately, the keto macros can be challenging for many people to sustain, especially the fat requirement. Also, those who are into weight lifting may find they aren’t getting enough protein.

As a result, the high protein ketogenic diet emerged by modifying the protein macro requirement.

Read on to find out more about the high protein ketogenic diet, how it’s different from other keto diets, what you should eat, foods to eat and avoid, and more.

How is the High Protein Ketogenic Diet Different From Other Keto Diets?

The high protein ketogenic diet became an alternative to the standard ketogenic diet for those who find it hard to sustain the required fat intake. Also, those who train heavily and need protein for muscle recovery may find that 20% protein from your calories is too little.

Let’s look at the differences between the keto diets:

  • Cyclical Ketogenic Diet (CKD): Often confused with carb cycling, you increase your carb intake one or two days a week from 5-10% to 15-20%. The increased carb days are known as “refeeding” days.
  • Standard Ketogenic Diet (SKD): The first ketogenic diet usually consists of 75%, 20% protein, and 5% carbs. Another macro breakdown includes 70%, 20% protein, 10% carbs.    
  • High-protein Ketogenic Diet: Similar to the standard ketogenic diet with modifications to protein. Popular macro breakdowns include 60-65% fat, 30% protein, and 5%-10% carbs.
  • Targeted Ketogenic Diet (TKD): Consume 30 grams of carbs before and after working out, equalling 60 grams of carbs. Assuming you do not eat other carbs during the day, it is about a 15% to 25% carb intake per day. The carbs can vary depending on the person.

Most ketogenic diets restrict carbs and increase fat to get into ketosis. The key is to have more fat than carbs to become fat-adapted, using fat as fuel.

The high protein ketogenic diet tweaks the protein macro from 20% to 30%. Excessive protein becomes glucose, making it unclear if this modification can disrupt ketosis. Although most believe as long as the fat intake is more than protein and carbs, mostly carbs, the body will remain in ketosis.

However, this diet plan is best for those who use weights or resistance train regularly.

Continue reading to find out which foods you should eat to reach the high protein ketogenic diet macros.

What Should You Eat on a High Protein Ketogenic Diet?

The foods you should consume are similar to a standard ketogenic diet. However, there are some adjustments to make to fulfill the high protein ketogenic diet macro requirements.

First, you must track your macros to get the best results. A standard keto diet consists of 70-75% fat, 20% protein, and 5-10% carbs.

We will use 65% fat, 30% protein, and 5% macro breakdown for this high protein ketogenic diet example.

To begin calculating your macros, you multiply your daily caloric intake by the macro percentage. For example, if you consume 2,000 calories a day, you multiply 65% and get 1,300.  From there, you divide 1,300 by 9 to get the amount of fat you should eat, which would be 144.4 grams.

Use the following to calculate macros:

  • 9 grams of fat in 1 calorie
  • 4 grams of protein in 1 calorie
  • 4 grams of carbs in 1 calorie

In this instance, a high protein ketogenic diet consuming 2,000 calories while using 65% fat, 30% protein, and 5% carbs will look like this:

  • 144.4 grams of fat
  • 150 grams of protein
  • 25 grams of carbs

Most people are not comfortable with the 5% carb intake, as 10% is another option if you need more carbs. You would decrease your fat intake by 5% to even out the macros and use a 60% fat, 30% protein, and 10% carb breakdown. In all, it is based on preferences and your body.

To meet the high protein requirement, let’s look at some foods you should eat—and avoid.

Foods to Eat

This section will cover which foods you can eat on a high protein ketogenic diet.

High-Fat, High-Protein Dairy

Dairy products are permitted on the keto diet, such as:

  • Most cheeses with high fat and high protein
  • Cream and cottage cheese
  • Sour cream
  • Butter
  • Full-fat cream
  • Whole Greek Yogurt with low sugar

Some products may have added protein, such as select cottage cheeses.

Healthy fats

Coconut oil and avocado oil are popular to cook with on this diet. Olive oil for salads is also allowed.

Avocado

The avocado is widely used on keto due to its healthy fat content and nutrients that can combat the keto flu, such as potassium.

Eggs

Eggs are excellent for fat and protein. Most eggs have more protein than fat, prompting people to increase their intake of eggs to meet the protein requirement.  

Poultry and Other Meat

Meats permitted on the high protein ketogenic diet are:

  • Chicken and turkey
  • Red meat such as grass-fed beef
  • Pork
  • Fatty fish such as salmon and mackerel
  • Elk, bison, or other game meat
  • Organ meats

Lean cuts are also allowed, such as 90/10, to consume more protein than fat to meet macros.

Nuts, Nut Butter, and Seeds

Nuts are a great way to meet fat requirements without consuming too much meat, such as:

  • Peanuts
  • Walnuts
  • Cashews
  • Pecans
  • Brazil Nuts

Nut butter is popular to use as “fat bombs,” such as:

  • Peanut butter
  • Cashew butter
  • Almond butter

Seeds allowed are:

  • Chia seeds
  • Flaxseeds
  • Hemp seeds
  • Sunflower seeds
  • Pumpkin seeds

Protein Powder

Using protein powder with no low sugar is permitted. Many keto-friendly protein powders exist, including whey protein with little to no sugar or carbs.

Unsweetened almond milk or cashew milk can be mixed with protein powder.

Vegetables

Non-starchy vegetables such as broccoli, asparagus, tomatoes, egg plants, cucumber, spinach, and similar products.  

Foods to Avoid

This section will cover which foods to avoid on the high protein ketogenic diet.

Starches

Avoid bread, potatoes, and rice.

One serving of oatmeal is permitted with protein powder with a 10% carb macro intake on a 2,000 calorie diet. Otherwise, it is too many carbs.

Beans and Legumes

Beans and legumes also contain too many carbs, although they contain lots of protein. However, the carb content is not fit for keto macros.

High-sugar Drinks

Fruit juices, alcohol, milkshakes, and iced coffee with added sugar is not allowed.

Desserts, Pastries, Candy

Due to their high sugar content, desserts, pastries, and most candy are not allowed. However, there are keto-friendly chocolate and desserts.

Pros and Cons of the High Protein Ketogenic Diet vs. Others

Let’s look at the pros and cons of a high protein ketogenic diet vs. other diets.

Pros:

  • More protein for muscle recovery
  • Reap the same benefits of the standard ketogenic diet, including massive fat loss
  • Improve athletic performance with additional protein

Cons:

  • It may be hard to sustain
  • Excessive protein can turn into glucose and disrupt ketosis

Summary

The high-protein ketogenic diet is an exciting alternative for those who want more protein for muscle recovery. Those who do heavy lifting at the gym may find this diet better than the standard ketogenic diet.

It is similar to the original keto diet with modification to the protein, allowing you to consume more eggs, lean meats, and protein powder.

In all, now that you know which foods to eat and avoid, give the high protein ketogenic diet a try!

High Protein Ketogenic Diet

The standard ketogenic diet is making headlines, with many people losing weight quickly while accelerating fat loss.

Unfortunately, the keto macros can be challenging for many people to sustain, especially the fat requirement. Also, those who are into weight lifting may find they aren’t getting enough protein.

As a result, the high protein ketogenic diet emerged by modifying the protein macro requirement.

Read on to find out more about the high protein ketogenic diet, how it’s different from other keto diets, what you should eat, foods to eat and avoid, and more.

How is the High Protein Ketogenic Diet Different From Other Keto Diets?

The high protein ketogenic diet became an alternative to the standard ketogenic diet for those who find it hard to sustain the required fat intake. Also, those who train heavily and need protein for muscle recovery may find that 20% protein from your calories is too little.

Let’s look at the differences between the keto diets:

  • Cyclical Ketogenic Diet (CKD): Often confused with carb cycling, you increase your carb intake one or two days a week from 5-10% to 15-20%. The increased carb days are known as “refeeding” days.
  • Standard Ketogenic Diet (SKD): The first ketogenic diet usually consists of 75%, 20% protein, and 5% carbs. Another macro breakdown includes 70%, 20% protein, 10% carbs.    
  • High-protein Ketogenic Diet: Similar to the standard ketogenic diet with modifications to protein. Popular macro breakdowns include 60-65% fat, 30% protein, and 5%-10% carbs.
  • Targeted Ketogenic Diet (TKD): Consume 30 grams of carbs before and after working out, equalling 60 grams of carbs. Assuming you do not eat other carbs during the day, it is about a 15% to 25% carb intake per day. The carbs can vary depending on the person.

Most ketogenic diets restrict carbs and increase fat to get into ketosis. The key is to have more fat than carbs to become fat-adapted, using fat as fuel.

The high protein ketogenic diet tweaks the protein macro from 20% to 30%. Excessive protein becomes glucose, making it unclear if this modification can disrupt ketosis. Although most believe as long as the fat intake is more than protein and carbs, mostly carbs, the body will remain in ketosis.

However, this diet plan is best for those who use weights or resistance train regularly.

Continue reading to find out which foods you should eat to reach the high protein ketogenic diet macros.

What Should You Eat on a High Protein Ketogenic Diet?

The foods you should consume are similar to a standard ketogenic diet. However, there are some adjustments to make to fulfill the high protein ketogenic diet macro requirements.

First, you must track your macros to get the best results. A standard keto diet consists of 70-75% fat, 20% protein, and 5-10% carbs.

We will use 65% fat, 30% protein, and 5% macro breakdown for this high protein ketogenic diet example.

To begin calculating your macros, you multiply your daily caloric intake by the macro percentage. For example, if you consume 2,000 calories a day, you multiply 65% and get 1,300.  From there, you divide 1,300 by 9 to get the amount of fat you should eat, which would be 144.4 grams.

Use the following to calculate macros:

  • 9 grams of fat in 1 calorie
  • 4 grams of protein in 1 calorie
  • 4 grams of carbs in 1 calorie

In this instance, a high protein ketogenic diet consuming 2,000 calories while using 65% fat, 30% protein, and 5% carbs will look like this:

  • 144.4 grams of fat
  • 150 grams of protein
  • 25 grams of carbs

Most people are not comfortable with the 5% carb intake, as 10% is another option if you need more carbs. You would decrease your fat intake by 5% to even out the macros and use a 60% fat, 30% protein, and 10% carb breakdown. In all, it is based on preferences and your body.

To meet the high protein requirement, let’s look at some foods you should eat—and avoid.

Foods to Eat

This section will cover which foods you can eat on a high protein ketogenic diet.

High-Fat, High-Protein Dairy

Dairy products are permitted on the keto diet, such as:

  • Most cheeses with high fat and high protein
  • Cream and cottage cheese
  • Sour cream
  • Butter
  • Full-fat cream
  • Whole Greek Yogurt with low sugar

Some products may have added protein, such as select cottage cheeses.

Healthy fats

Coconut oil and avocado oil are popular to cook with on this diet. Olive oil for salads is also allowed.

Avocado

The avocado is widely used on keto due to its healthy fat content and nutrients that can combat the keto flu, such as potassium.

Eggs

Eggs are excellent for fat and protein. Most eggs have more protein than fat, prompting people to increase their intake of eggs to meet the protein requirement.  

Poultry and Other Meat

Meats permitted on the high protein ketogenic diet are:

  • Chicken and turkey
  • Red meat such as grass-fed beef
  • Pork
  • Fatty fish such as salmon and mackerel
  • Elk, bison, or other game meat
  • Organ meats

Lean cuts are also allowed, such as 90/10, to consume more protein than fat to meet macros.

Nuts, Nut Butter, and Seeds

Nuts are a great way to meet fat requirements without consuming too much meat, such as:

  • Peanuts
  • Walnuts
  • Cashews
  • Pecans
  • Brazil Nuts

Nut butter is popular to use as “fat bombs,” such as:

  • Peanut butter
  • Cashew butter
  • Almond butter

Seeds allowed are:

  • Chia seeds
  • Flaxseeds
  • Hemp seeds
  • Sunflower seeds
  • Pumpkin seeds

Protein Powder

Using protein powder with no low sugar is permitted. Many keto-friendly protein powders exist, including whey protein with little to no sugar or carbs.

Unsweetened almond milk or cashew milk can be mixed with protein powder.

Vegetables

Non-starchy vegetables such as broccoli, asparagus, tomatoes, egg plants, cucumber, spinach, and similar products.  

Foods to Avoid

This section will cover which foods to avoid on the high protein ketogenic diet.

Starches

Avoid bread, potatoes, and rice.

One serving of oatmeal is permitted with protein powder with a 10% carb macro intake on a 2,000 calorie diet. Otherwise, it is too many carbs.

Beans and Legumes

Beans and legumes also contain too many carbs, although they contain lots of protein. However, the carb content is not fit for keto macros.

High-sugar Drinks

Fruit juices, alcohol, milkshakes, and iced coffee with added sugar is not allowed.

Desserts, Pastries, Candy

Due to their high sugar content, desserts, pastries, and most candy are not allowed. However, there are keto-friendly chocolate and desserts.

Pros and Cons of the High Protein Ketogenic Diet vs. Others

Let’s look at the pros and cons of a high protein ketogenic diet vs. other diets.

Pros:

  • More protein for muscle recovery
  • Reap the same benefits of the standard ketogenic diet, including massive fat loss
  • Improve athletic performance with additional protein

Cons:

  • It may be hard to sustain
  • Excessive protein can turn into glucose and disrupt ketosis

Summary

The high-protein ketogenic diet is an exciting alternative for those who want more protein for muscle recovery. Those who do heavy lifting at the gym may find this diet better than the standard ketogenic diet.

It is similar to the original keto diet with modification to the protein, allowing you to consume more eggs, lean meats, and protein powder.

In all, now that you know which foods to eat and avoid, give the high protein ketogenic diet a try!